The great divide

There is a big difference between an opinion based on perception and what you read about a specific topic and the knowledge obtained from the experience of having direct contact with the facts.

My familiarity with this subject is substantiated by more than twenty years of travelling throughout the United States from North to South, from East to West coast, visiting countryside small towns, big cities, and great metropolis and seeing and talking to people from different levels of the society and education.

The argument that was raised over the last couple of weeks is that Donald Trump has created a great divide in American society which has culminated with the invasion o the capitol in Washington.

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Scorched earth policy, instituted by Abraham Lincoln and executed by General Ulysses Grant.

The great divide exposing the contrast of an estranged society has existed for more than one hundred and fifty years, since the end of the Civil War, the conflict that did not unite the nation, but contrarily drove a wedge between not only between North and South but also between the poor and the affluent, the educated and the backwardness.

The American civil war was not only caused by segregationist policies but also by the confrontation of the Southern States cosmopolitan and sophisticated society, against an urbanized industrialized North.

The South identified with the original style of life and evils of racial discrimination of the English colonies, which were vital for the cotton production for the British industry.

Regardless of the covert backing from England, the Southern Confederate States could not resist the power of the North, a newly industrialized nation that was a creation of a new America.

What followed was the complete scorched earth policy, instituted by Abraham Lincoln and executed by General Ulysses Grant.

Countless farms and beautiful towns, like Atlanta, were torched to the ground until the final surrender.

Grant on his own has an incredible story.

Discharged from the Army for alcoholism, later became Lincoln’s right-hand man in the war to defeat the South.

Countless farms and beautiful towns, like Atlanta, were torched to the ground until the final surrender.

General Grant ascended to the Presidency of America at the end of the war, shortly after Lincoln’s assassination by a Southerner.

Surrounded by collaborators that conducted systematic pillage of the defeated states, Grant’s mandate was tainted by corruption and nepotism.

For the man in the street of the South, the economy never recovered.

The dividends of oil and other natural resources going to the big companies controlled by oligarch capitalist families of Northern big cities, like New York.  

New Orleans, Memphis, and many other cities in the south are beautiful with great charm and historic references, but you get a depressing feeling when you visit them, comparing the progress of California and New York.

Longwood, nostalgic sadness of a beautiful estate ruined by the war

I visited the countryside, and you can not avoid a feeling of nostalgic sadness to see beautiful estates, like Longwood, whose families were ruined by the war.

The dissatisfaction of the Southern states and the Midwest is not a creation of Donald Trump.

They used to be called in the seventies “Nixon land”, referring to the republican President Richard Nixon’s similar approach to the disfranchised southern and midwest communities.

The population that cast more than forty million votes for the Republicans is not going to vanish because it is an integral part o America’s turbulent heritage.

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